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How small businesses can help close the gender pay gap

The Andrews Labor Government has released new educational resources to help small and medium-sized businesses better understand how they can act to close the gender pay gap.

Minister for Industrial Relations Tim Pallas today launched a range of materials developed by the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission (VEOHRC) with funding from the Government to support businesses in their understanding of equal pay.

“On average, women must work 60 days more to earn the same salary as a man – which is disgraceful,” said Minister for Industrial Relations Tim Pallas.

“By supporting small and medium-sized businesses with information and resources, it will help to reduce the gender pay gap and boost fairness across the economy.”

“It’s a win for everyone – research shows that equitable workplaces are more productive, have less staff turnover and higher morale and are more profitable.”

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The three videos with interactive features and three short e-learning modules are tailored to the characteristics and needs of small and medium-sized businesses.

Small and medium-sized businesses make up a significant proportion of the Victorian workforce and economy. Covering two in three employed Victorians, these businesses have the power to effect enormous change when it comes to achieving equal pay.

The Government and VEOHRC have previously released the “Equal pay matters: Achieving gender pay equality in small-to-medium enterprises” report. The report noted that the drivers of pay inequality at smaller organisations include limited understanding about the concept of equal pay and how it applies to them.

The resources were co-designed with businesses and industry experts and will be distributed widely.

Recent data from the Workplace Gender Equality Agency shows the national gender pay gap continues to widen, now sitting at 14.1 per cent, which is an increase of 0.3 percentage points over the past six months. This means men on average earn $263.90 a week more than women.

As part of the Victorian Budget 2022-23 the Government invested $1 million to promote gender pay equity workplace initiatives and the functions of the Equal Workplaces Advisory Council.

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